To A Little Man With A Very Large Beard By Isaac Ben Khalif

Is it all gravity to shock Is it to make the people stare, And be thyself a laughing-stock (1 of 2)09 01 2008 16 01 44 After thy board obsequious run, I always fancy that I moot Some father followed by his son. A man like thoo scarce o'or appeared A board like thino, whoro shall wo find it Surely thou cherishest thy beard, In hopes to hide thyself behind it Next Lamiat Alajem, by Mauid Eddin Alhassan Abu Ismael Altograi Sacred Texts Islam Index Previous Next Arabian Poetry, by W. A. Clouston,...

Kabs Poem Of The Mantle

Therefore was my heart that day distracted, raving after her, irredeemably enchained. 2. On the morrow of our separation, when she went forth, Beatrice was no other than a bleating antelope, with downcast glance, and eyes set off with collyrium. 3. When she smiles, she displays a row of teeth of glancing whiteness, as though it had been a damaskeened sword-blade, once tempered, and then dipped a second time in wine, (1 of 6)09 01 2008 16 04 00 4. Dashed, on a cold...

The Poem Of Amru

Our morning draught see note on v. 74, Amriolkais A cheerful cup of wine in the morning, says Nott, was a favourite indulgence with the more luxurious Persians. And it was not uncommon among the Easterns, to salute a friend by saying 'May your morning potation be agreeable to you ' Thus Hafiz (Nott's translation) While the soft lyre and cymbals sound, Pour cheerful melody around Quaff thy enlivening draught of morning wine And as the melting notes inspire Thy soul with amorous desire,...

The Poem Of Tarafa

The Bedouins feed their camels with the leaves of the erak-tree. vv. 8, 9. Lane, n his Modern Egyptians, describing the composition of the black powder, called kohl, with which ladies of Cairo paint the edge of their eyelids, both above and below the eye, mentions the powder of various kinds of lead-ore (kohl el-hagar) as being employed for this purpose. He also states that some women, to make their teeth glisten, tattoo their lips. It would appear from these verses that the Arab women in...

Rakeek To His Female Companions

THOUGH the peevish tongues upbraid, Though the brows of wisdom scowl, Fair ones, here on roses laid, Careless will we quaff the bowl. Let the cup, with nectar crowned, Through the grove its beams display It can shed a lustre round, (1 of 2)09 01 2008 16 00 02 Arabian Poetry Shorter Pieces of Arabian Poetry Rakeek to his Female Companions Circling still with ceaseless flight, Till the streaks of gray expand O'er the fleeting robe of Night. Seize the moments that remain Thus our joys with yours...

By Saif Addaulet Sultan Of Aleppo

I saw them mark each glance of mine I saw thy terrors, and my soul Shared every pang that tortured thine. (1 of 2)09 01 2008 16 01 15 Arabian Poetry Shorter Pieces of Arabian Poetry To His Favourite Mistress, by Saif Addaulet, Sultan of Aleppo Or quench my glowing flame, they strove Each deep-laid scheme, each envious art, But waked my fears for her I love. 'Twas this compelled the stern decree That forced thee to those distant towers, And left me nought but love for thee, To cheer my solitary...

Another Suitor For Abla

While Antar was gone to assist the tribe of Mazin, something happened which marred his hopes of winning his bolovod Abla, and commoncod a sorios of troubles to himself, to his family, and ovon to tho whole tribo of Abs. This was tho betrothal of Abla to a noblo Absian named Amarah a concoitod coxcomb, very particular in his dross, fond of porfumos, and always keeping company with women and young girls. Tho fame of Abla's boauty having reached this Bodouin exquisite, ho sent a fomalo slave to...

The Song Of Maisuna

MAISUNA was a daughter of the tribe of Calab a tribe, according to Abulfeda, remarkable both for the purity of dialect spoken in it and for the number of poets it had produced. She was married, whilst very young, to the Khalif Mowiah but this exalted situation by no means suited the disposition of Maisuna and, amidst all the pomp and splendour of Damascus, she languished for the simple pleasures of her native desert. These feelings gave birth to the following simple stanzas, which she took the...

Romance Of Antar

IT is generally believed that this celebrated Arabian Romance was composed, in the eighth century, from traditionary tales which had been long current in the East, by El-Asma'ee, a famous philologist and poet at the court of Haroon Er-Rasheed. Other authors and sources (for instance, Johainah and Abu Obeidah) are mentioned in the work, but these, according to Von Hammer, have been inserted by story-tellers in the coffeehouses. Lane, in his admirable work on the Modern Egyptians, remarks that...

Hatim Tai The Generous Arab Chiefp

Hatim Tai was an Arabian chief who lived a short time prior to the promulgation of Mohammedanism. He has been so much celebrated through the East for his generosity, that even at the present day the greatest encomium which can be given to a generous man is to say that he is as liberal as Hatim. He was also a poet but his talents were principally exerted in recommending his favourite virtue. An Arabian author thus emphatically describes Hatim's character His poems expressed the charms of...