Amoretti Sonnet 74 Most happy letters framd by skilfull trade Edmund Spenser

1595 This poem details the second year of the courtship between Edmund Spenser and Elizabeth Boyle. It uses the linked quatrain pattern of the Spenserian sonnet and blends the poet's love for the three Elizabeths in his life his mother, his queen, and his beloved. The speaker begins the first quatrain with a paean to the letters that make up the name of Elizabeth, because three women bearing that name have made him happy, giving him gifts of body, fortune and of mind l. 4 . The second quatrain...

W To Her Unconstant Lover

Isabella Whitney 1567 This is the first poem in Isabella Whitney's first book of poetry, The Copy of a Letter. As the title of this poem suggests, the speaker is I. W., or Isabella Whitney, and she is writing a letter to an unfaithful, or unconstant, lover. She begins by telling her faithless lover that she has heard he is going to be married, in spite of his attempts to keep the fact secret, or close l. 1 . Whitney then begins to alternate between speaking as a jilted woman who reminds her...

Burning Babe The Robert Southwell

1595 The most famous poem by the English Roman Catholic writer Robert Southwell is a Christmas vision. The poet stands shivering outdoors on a snowy winter's night when, suddenly, his chest feels warm ll. 1-4 . He looks up in fear to see if he is near a fire and sees the vision of a baby burning. The baby is weeping, he sees, but the tears only kindle the fire. The babe explains that he is sad because people have not come to warm themselves in the flame ll. 5-8 . Then, in a series of...

English Chaucerians This is the name

Given to a group of 15th-century English writers and associated texts written after Geoffrey Chaucer's death. These writings reflect Chaucerian form, content, tone, vocabulary, and style. A number of them even cite Chaucer directly, as both source and inspiration. This group includes John Lydgate, Thomas Hoccleve, Benedict Burgh d. ca. 1483 , George Ashby d. 1537 , Henry Bradshaw d. 1513 , George Ripley 15th century , Thomas Norton 1532-1584 , and Osbern Boke-nam 1393-ca. 1447 . The texts and...

What Is The Rhyme Scheme Of Leave Me O Love

Sir Philip Sidney. Oxford and New York oxford university Press, 1989. Fabry, Frank J. Sidney's Verse Adaptations to Two Sixteenth-Century Italian Art Songs. Renaissance Quarterly 23, no. 3 1970 237-255. Marquis, Paul A. Rereading Sidney's Certain Sonnets. Renaissance Studies 8, no. 1 1994 65-75. Ringler, William A., ed. The Poems of Sir Philip Sidney. Oxford Clarendon Press, 1962. Sidney, Philip Sir . Poems of Sir Philip Sidney. Edited by W. A. Ringler. Oxford Oxford...

Amoretti Sonnet 68 Easter Sonnet Most glorious Lord of lyfe that on this day Edmund

Spenser 1595 Sonnet 68 of Edmund Spenser's Amoretti is also known as the Easter Sonnet. Paired with Sonnet 22 said to invoke Ash Wednesday in the Christian calendar , it is central to autobiographical, numero-logical, religious, and calendar real-time interpretations of the sonnet sequence. Moreover, the number of sonnets between 22 and 68 equals the number of days between Ash Wednesday and Easter in 1594, the year of Spenser's marriage. Thus, the calendar and autobiographical interpretations...

Shakespeares sonnets Sonnet 3 Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest William

Shakespeare 1599 Of the 154 sonnets written by William Shakespeare, the first 17 form what is known as the procreation sonnet set. These poems urge the reader to have sex both for enjoyment and for procreation. They also emphasize marriage as the fulfillment of social obligations and the underlying structure of society. Part of the encouragement to procreate is a desire for preservation of family, humanity, and English society , and Sonnet 3 emphasizes this idea of continuation. in the poem,...

Love That Doth Reign And Live Within My Thought Henry Howard

Earl of Surrey ca. 1543 Surrey's Love that doth reign and live within my thought is a translation of Petrarch's sonnet 140 of Canzoniere. In translating Petrarch's SoNNET, Surrey has changed the rhyme to take the English sonnet form. In the first quatrain, the speaker declares how the personified Love has conquered and consumed his body. Now Love, quite physically, lives in the speaker's thought and breast. Love has erected a banner on the speaker's face. In the second quatrain, the female...

Nightingale The Philomela

Sir Philip Sidney 1595 The Nightingale, widely considered one of the best of Sir Philip Sidney's short poems, appears in the second part of his Defense of Poesy. It is based on a popular song of the time, Non Credo Gia Che Piu Infelice Amante. Also known by the title Philomela, the poem is based on the story of Philomela in book 6 of Ovid's Metamorphoses. Philomela and Procne were the daughters of King Pandion of Attica. Procne married Tereus of Thrace, though he lusted after Philomela....

Stand Whoso List Sir Thomas Wyatt

1557 This short poem is a translation from Seneca's Thyestes lines 391-403 . Like some of Sir Thomas Wyatt's other political laments, it is a declaration that life at the centers of political power here described as the slipper top Of court's estates ll. 1-2 is far too uncertain. Its joys are brackish l. 4 , meaning that even at its best, the courtly life offers pleasures that only partially mitigate the dangers. Indeed, to ingest them may be poisonous. Instead, says the speaker, he wishes to...

When To Her Lute Corinna Sings

Thomas Campion ca. 1601 This song was first printed with music by Thomas Campion himself in A Booke of Ayres. It describes the poet's lover, Corinna, singing to her lute, a phrase that implies that she sings while accompanying herself and that she addresses her lute when she sings. The first stanza asserts that Corin-na's singing is powerful enough to revive the lute's leaden stringes l. 2 , punningly referring to the inanimate material of the strings while ascribing to the sing er's voice an...

Long Love That In My Thought Doth Harbor The Sir Thomas Wyatt

1557 By most accounts, Sir Thomas Wyatt's visit to Italy in 1527 gave him the incentive to translate several of Petrarch's sonnets into English, including this version of Sonnet 140, which was also translated by Wyatt's contemporary, Henry Howard, earl of Surrey. Wyatt's confidence both in the suitability of English and in his competence as a poet may account for the freedom with which he reinterpreted, rather than slavishly translated, the Petrarchan poems. For example, in this sonnet, line...

Mine Own John Poins Sir Thomas

Wyatt 1536-1537 This poem is one of three epistolary satires satirical poems written as letters attributed to Sir Thomas Wyatt. It is addressed to John Poynz Poins , a fellow courtier and friendly correspondent from Gloucestershire. The poem is a rough translation of Luigi Alamanni's 1495-1556 Tenth Satire, and follows the Italian poem in several particulars though it also focuses more specifically on Wyatt's own de facto house arrest on his family's estate during 1536. It is a long answer to...

Shakespeares sonnets Sonnet 87 Farewell thou art too dear for my possessing William

Shakespeare 1599 In format, Sonnet 87 follows the three quatrains and a couplet pattern traditionally associated with the English sonnet form. Similar to Sonnet 20, Sonnet 87 relies on feminine rhyme for most of the poem lines 2 and 4 are an exception . Feminine rhymes pair two-syllable words in a stressed unstressed pattern reminiscent of the rhyme schemes found in medieval romances they were usually saved for comical poems, whereas this sonnet is solemn in tone. The poem is filled with...

Parliament of fowls the Geoffrey

Chaucer ca. 1380 The Parliament of Fowls is one of Geoffrey Chaucer's major dream visions. Traditionally, there has been an assumption that the poem was written for an engagement perhaps that of Richard II and Anne of Bohemia , but no consensus has been achieved regarding which betrothal, if any, the poem seeks to comment on. The action of the Parliament takes place on Saint valentine's Day the poem may, in fact, have inaugurated the tradition of valentine's Day love poems. Chaucer wrote the...

Shakespeares sonnets Sonnet 90 Then hate me when thou wilt if ever now William

Shakespeare (1599) Sonnet 90 continues the thought developed in Sonnet 89. The speaker asks that, if the beloved young man plans to hate him, he do it now, so that this most disastrous blow will mitigate all later pain. If the hatred comes later, after lesser setbacks have occurred, it will strike an already grieving man as catastrophe. The sonnet is built around elements of time's contrasts then when, now then, first last and comparisons. All of these elements blend to make a poignant...

Astrophil and Stella Sonnet 37 My mouth doth water and my breast doth swell

Philip Sidney ca. 1582 A variation of the Italian Petrarchan sonnet, the rhyme scheme in Sonnet 37 follows an octave and sestet rhyme pattern of abbaabba, cdcdee. The poem itself, however, exhibits an additional variation a syntactical and semantic one that is an aberration within the sonnet tradition. This poem is unique in that it uses the first quatrain to announce a riddle, which then evolves over the next 10 lines. Sonnet 37 is also significant because it is the first poem in Astrophil and...