The Little Preface

The transforming infioenoe indicated by that haying gone abroad, then under heaven there was no such thing as any violation of propriety. Even in a degenerate age the sons of the duke were all sincere and good, as in the time when the Urn's footsteps were sebi. 1. The Ts'Soh ch'aou seta forth the virtue of some prinoe's wife. By the accumulation of meritorious deeds, the prince has reached his dignity, and the comes from her parents' home, and occupies it with him. Her virtue being like that of...

The Mann Eus Of The Ancient Chinese

At the passages which I have brought together, and the results deduced from them he will be able to verify them, if he desires it, in the text which I have carefully consulted, or at least in the translation of Lacharme. He will be able in the same way to verify, in the text, or in the published translations of them, the occasional quotations which I have made from the Shoo-king, the YihJciitg (that ancient Work on divination, at least as old as the She-king), and finally from the curious work...

Minor Odes Of The Kingdom

The Luh ming is a festal song, proper to the entertainment of the ministers, admirable guests. When the ruler had feasted them with food and drink, he also presented them with baskets of silken fabrics, to carry out his generous feeling, so that afterwards those loyal ministers, admirable guests, would do their utmost for him. 2. The 8m mow is congratulatory of an envoy on his return. When one does good service and his merit is recognized, he feels pleased. 8. In the Hwang-hwang chay hwa we...

Sacrificial Odes And Praisesongs

The Ts'ing meaou. was used in sacrificing to king Win. When the duke of Chow had finished the city of Loh, he gave audience to the feudal princes, and led them on to sacrifice to king Win. 2. In Wei t'een the wing, we have an announcement to king Win of the universal peace which was secured . 3. The Wei ts'ing was an accompaniment of the Seang dance. 4. The Leeh wbn was used at the accession of king Ch'ing to the government, when the princes assisted him in sacrifice. 5. The 2*68 took was used...

The Prosody Of The

The reader of the Book of Poetry is at once struck by the brevity of the lines, and by the fact that nearly all the pieces in the Metre nd rhyme co ect'on ar posed in rhyme. Under these two heads of the metre and the rhyme may be comprehended nearly all that is necessary to be said on the prosody of the She. 2. All the earliest attempts of the Chinese at poetical composition appear to have been of the same form, in lines consisting of four words, forming, from the nature of the language, four...

Nmmm a ztfcmnm

Rn& ifam'bxmmMAMM u & m> & w ffl t ffl a a ft tiff m z Kaon K'ih being fond of gain, and paying no regard to his rnler, duke Win hated him, and wished to remove him to a distance. He was unable to do so, however, and sent him to the borders to oppose the hordes of the north. There he displayed his forces, and kept them moving about, near the Ho. So long a time elapsed without their being recalled, that the troops dispersed and returned to Ch'ing, Kaou K'ih himself fleeing to Ch'in....

Tw m M m m je j m m m it jrjl m m

This grouping of the characters shows that, though only the division of the first tone into an upper and a lower series is expressly mentioned, yet we must suppose a corresponding distinct ion carried into the other tones. Thus it is that we have about twice as many representatives of the characters in the 2d and 8d tones as of either of the upper or lower aeries of those of the 1st tone. The 4th tone characters are distributed under those of the other tones which end with consonants. This...

Appendix

ON THE VARIOUS FORMS IN WHICH I'OETRV HAS BEEN WRITTEN AMONG THE CHINESE. 1. lanes of fonr words, with a more or less regular observance of rule, is, we have seen, the normal measure of the ancient odes in the Book of Poetry. I have repeatedly indicated also my opinion that the rules now acknowledged for poetical composition are of a nature to oripple the genius of the writer. A sketch therefore, in as brief compass as possible, of the various measures in which Chinese poets have given...

Preface

When the author published his third volume, containing the Book of Historical Documents, in 1865, he hoped to proceed in 1867 to print the Book of Poetry which is only now offered to the public, He was obliged, however, early in that year to return to England, from which he came back to Hongkong in the spring of the past year, prepared to go to press at once with the present volume but the loss by shipwreck of his printing paper rendered it necessary to defer the commencement of the work till...

Info

For three rouged as nephew undressed porcelain held flesh cheek porcelain without undressing, earthen, brouxht. blood, pulnte. earthen, A In alas for the kingdom There is no Spirit I liave not sacrificed to. He rwrenccd GikI. for XXVII read XVII. XUI Y1U. running heuding Sicoau Seaol'. Any mistakes in the Chinese titles of the odes us expressed in Italic letters may be corrected