Nonerotic Connotations Of Peitho

Pausanias mentions the cult of Peitho at Sicyon, one of the few cults in which she was worshipped as an independent deity.6 The foundation myth is particularly interesting since if related to an early cult it may be able to provide an explanation for the goddess's original associations and functions. However, we cannot be sure about the age of the cult, since we have no epigraphical documents to confirm it.7 The myth does not present Peitho as a personified, active deity. Instead, Peitho...

Adornment scenes epiphanies and their cultic background

For our purposes it is significant that Aphrodite appears in a double role. In the introductory hymnic praise she is represented as the ultimate divine authority and source of desire, responsible for any confusion of the mind caused through that.40 In the narrative section, however, according to Zeus' wish, she embodies and experiences what she normally metes out to mortals. At the beginning her divine nature is only suspected by Anchises. Although Aphrodite does not quite look like a mortal...

Love And Sleep

The reason why Hypnos and the corresponding abstract quality deserves attention is that his function and effect are strikingly similar to Eros' attributes in Hesiod's Theogony and to the components of Aphrodite's KXCTtoq i aq. I suggest that the personality of both Himeros and Eros is influenced by that of Hypnos (and probably also Thanatos), whose mythical identity was, as literary and iconographical evidence suggests, fully developed earlier.77 As lovemaking does not seem to be sufficient to...

Peitho In Pindars 4th Pythian

We have seen earlier that in Pindar's 9th Pythian Ode (39f.), Peitho embodies persuasion as a preliminary stage to the consummation of love. Elsewhere, Pindar presents Peitho in a role which is characterized by violence and compulsion. In the 4th Pythian Ode (213-9), she is linked with Aphrodite, but in contrast to her appearances in epic, she is not presented in association with seducing words, oapiatuq, nap aaiq and ai uXioi Aoyoi, i.e. with means by which female charm wins over a man....

Aphrodite And Dione

Although iconographical parallels and the ancient historical tradition suggest that Aphrodite is of Phoenician origin, Ishtar-Astarte, when she came to Greece, did not enter a religious vacuum. Aphrodite also has early connections with the Charites which are reflected not only in iconography, but also in myth and cult. This will be discussed later. The other Greek deity with whom Aphrodite has early connections is Dione. The depiction of Aphrodite's relationship with this Indo-European goddess...

Epic and early lyric poetry

When modern scholars speak of Eros, they often refer neither to the love-god nor to the non-personified meanings of the term spwq, but to the phenomenon of Greek love more generally.41 Whereas aspects of cult have been frequently discussed in recent scholarship, the examination of the original, literal meanings of spwq has been a matter of less interest.42 Certain ideas and expressions denoting the effects of desire occur in the Homeric and Hesiodic poems and are common in the Homeric Hymns as...

Hesiod And The Cosmological Tradition

As presented in the Theogony, Eros' activity is closely related to the sphere of mortals and anthropomorphic gods, but his role and function are those of a primeval element among two other, non-anthropomorphic principles Chaos and Gaia. In order to resolve this ambiguity, which is also reflected in the god's second appearance as Aphrodite's companion (Theog. 201f.), scholars suggested that there were originally two different traditions of the god which Hesiod has combined Eros the cosmic...

Evidence For Eros As A Cult Figure In The Archaic and classical period

Modern scholars have found evidence for cults of Eros throughout Greece, the most famous being that at Thespiae in Boeotia.3 Although it has been conceded that official worship was rare, Eros is generally thought to have been established as a cult deity in very early times. The main source for the scholars' argument, Pausanias' Description of Greece (9,27,1), however, is comparatively late (2nd century AD) and inconsistent with the only two ancient literary testimonies which make reference to...