Notes on Contributors

Paul Baines is Professor of English at the University of Liverpool. He is the author of The House of Forgery in Eighteenth-Century Britain (1999), The Complete Critical Guide to Alexander Pope (2000), and The Long Eighteenth Century (2004), and co-editor of Five Romantic Plays 1768-1821 (2000).

Ros Ballaster is a Fellow and Tutor in English at Mansfield College, Oxford University. She is the author of Seductive Forms: Women's Amatory Fiction 1674-1740 (1992) and Fabulous Orients: Fictions of the East in England 1662-1785 (2005).

Richard Bradford is Professor of English at the University of Ulster. His most recent books include A Complete Critical Guide to John Milton (2001), Lucky Him: The Life of Kingsley Amis (2001), Augustan Measures: Restoration and Eighteenth Century Writings on Prosody and Metre (2002), and First Boredom Then Fear: The Life of Philip Larkin (2005).

Gerard Carruthers is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Scottish Literature at the University of Glasgow. He is author of Robert Burns (2005) and co-editor of a critical edition of Walter Scott's Reliquiae Trotcosienses (2004) and English Romanticism and the Celtic World (2003).

Caryn Chaden is Associate Professor of English and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. She is the author of articles on Samuel Richardson, Oliver Goldsmith, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, and Mary Leapor.

Rachel Crawford is Professor of English at the University of San Francisco. She is author of Poetry, Enclosure, and the Vernacular Landscape 1700-1830 (2002). Her current research project focuses on the function of Siam as Place in the British imagination.

Markman Ellis is Professor of Eighteenth-Century Studies in the School of English and Drama at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the author of The Politics of Sensibility (1996), The History of Gothic Fiction (2000), and The Coffee House: A Cultural History (2004), and is co-editor with Brycchan Carey and Sara Salih of Discourses of Slavery and Abolition (2004).

David Fairer is Professor of Eighteenth-Century English Literature at the University of Leeds. He is the author of Pope's Imagination (1984), The Poetry of Alexander Pope (1989), and English Poetry of the Eighteenth Century (2003). He is the editor of Pope: New Contexts (1990), The Correspondence of Thomas Warton (1995), and, with Christine Gerrard, Eighteenth-Century Poetry: An Annotated Anthology (1999; 2nd edn. 2004).

Christine Gerrard is Fellow and Tutor in English at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. She is the author of The Patriot Opposition to Walpole: Politics, Poetry, and National Myth, 1725-1742 (1994) and Aaron Hill: The Muses' Projector, 1685-1750 (2003). She is the co-editor, with David Fairer, of Eighteenth-Century Poetry: An Annotated Anthology (1999; 2nd edn., 2004).

John Goodridge is Professor of English at Nottingham Trent University. He is the author of Rural Life in Eighteenth-Century English Poetry (1995) and general editor of the Pickering & Chatto series "English Labouring Class Poets."

Mina Gorji is a Research Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford University. She is writing a study of John Clare and vernacular poetry and editing a collection of essays for Routledge, Rude Britannia, on the cultures and values of rudeness in modern Britain.

Charlotte Grant was Senior Research Fellow at the AHRC Centre for the Study of the Domestic Interior. She is co-editor with Elizabeth Eger, Cliona O' Gallchoir, and Penny Warburton of Women, Writing and the Public Sphere 1700-1830 (2001), editor of Flora (2003), and co-editor with Jeremy Aynsley of Imagined Interiors (2006).

Isobel Grundy is a Professor Emerita at the University of Alberta. She is author of Samuel Johnson and the Scale of Greatness (1986), Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Comet of the Enlightenment (1999), and (with Virginia Blain and Patricia Clements) The Feminist Companion to Literature in English: Women Writers from the Middle Ages to the Present (1990). She is a joint author of the forthcoming electronic history of women's writing in the British Isles produced by the Orlando Project (director: Patricia Clements).

Brean Hammond is Professor of Modern English Literature at the University of Nottingham. He is author of Professional Imaginative Writing in England 1670-1740 (1997) and Making the Novel (2006). He is the author of several books and many articles on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century writing.

David Hopkins is Professor of English Literature at the University of Bristol. Among his recent publications are (as author) Writers and Their Work: John Dry den (2004) and (as editor), with Paul Hammond, volume 5 of The Poems of John Dryden (2005) and, with Stuart Gillespie, volume 3 of The Oxford History of Literary Translation in English (2005).

Shaun Irlam is Chair of the Department of Comparative Literature of the University at Buffalo, where he has taught since 1993. His research and teaching focus on the role of colonialism and empire in literary and intellectual discourses of the eighteenth century. His book Elations: The Poetics of Enthusiasm in Eighteenth-Century Britain was published in 1999. He also teaches postcolonial theory and literatures with specific emphasis on Africa.

Freya Johnston belongs to the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Warwick. She is author of Samuel Johnson and the Art of Sinking, 1709-1791 (2005).

Robert Jones is a Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century Literature at the University of Leeds. He is the author of Gender and the Formation of Taste in Eighteenth-Century Britain: The Analysis of Beauty (1998). More recent articles have explored Anna Laetitia Barbauld and James Boswell, Thomas Chatterton, Joshua Reynolds, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan. He is currently working on a book on British responses to the American War of Independence.

George Justice is Associate Professor of English at the University of MissouriColumbia. He is the author of The Manufacturers of Literature: Writing and the Literary Marketplace in Eighteenth-Century England (2002) and co-editor, with Nathan Tinker, of Women's Writing and the Circulation of Ideas: Manuscript Publication in England, 1550-1800 (2002).

Suvir Kaul is Professor of English and Director of the South Asia Center at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Poems of Nation, Anthems of Empire (2000) and co-editor, with Ania Loomba, Antoinette Burton, Matti Bunzl, and Jed Esty, of Postcolonial Studies and Beyond (2005).

Bridget Keegan is Professor of English at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. She is the editor of Eighteenth-Century Labouring-Class Poets, vol. 2: 1740-1780 (2003) and, with James McKusick, Literature and Nature: Four Centuries of British and American Nature Writing (2000). She has published numerous articles on British laboring-class poetry, in particular laboring-class writing about nature.

Jennifer Keith is Associate Professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She is the author of Poetry and the Feminine from Behn to Cowper (2005) and essays on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British poetry.

Kathryn R. King is Professor of English at the University of Montevallo in Alabama. She is author of Jane Barker, Exile (2000) and co-editor, with Alex Pettit, of Eliza Haywood's The Female Spectator (2001), and has published widely on women writers of the early eighteenth century. She is currently at work on a critical biography of Eliza Haywood.

Margaret M. Koehler is Assistant Professor of English at Otterbein College in Westerville, Ohio. She is working on a book about personification in Restoration and early eighteenth-century poetry.

Clark Lawlor is a Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Northumbria at Newcastle upon Tyne. He is the author of Consumption and Literature: The Making of the Romantic Disease (forthcoming 2006) and editor of Sciences of Body and Mind (2003), volume 2 in Literature and Science, 1660—1834, gen. ed. Judith Hawley (8 vols.), and has written various articles on literature and science in the long eighteenth century.

Emma Mason is a Lecturer in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick. She is the author of Women Poets of the Nineteenth Century (2006) and, with Mark Knight, Nineteenth-Century Religion and Literature: An Introduction (2006). She is also a co-editor of two forthcoming volumes on biblical hermeneutics: The Oxford Handbook to the Reception History of the Bible and Blackwell's Companion to the Bible in English Literature.

John D. Morillo is Associate Professor of English at North Carolina State University, Raleigh. He is the author of Uneasy Feelings: Literature, the Passions, and Class from Neoclassicism to Romanticism (2001), as well as articles on Dennis, Pope, Shelley, Southey, and Scott. He served as Director of Graduate Studies in English from 2001 to 2005.

Chris Mounsey is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Winchester. Chris has written and taught extensively on eighteenth-century literature. Book publications include Christopher Smart: Clown of God and Presenting Gender: Changing Sex in Early-Modern Culture, both from Bucknell University Press. Chris is editor of the British Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies for the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and also organizer of its annual conference.

Bill Overton is Professor of Literary Studies at Loughborough University. He is the author of The Novel of Female Adultery: Love and Gender in Continental European Fiction 1830—1900 (1996) and Fictions of Female Adultery: Theories and Circumtexts 1684—1890 (2002), and the editor of A Letter to My Love: Love Poems by Women First Published in the Barbados Gazette, 1731—1737 (2001). He is currently completing a book-length study of the eighteenth-century British verse epistle.

Juan Christian Pellicer is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Oslo. Since completing a doctoral thesis on John Philips (2002) he has published articles on eighteenth-century georgic and related topics, and currently contributes the section on eighteenth-century poetry in The Year's Work in English Studies. With John Goodridge he has edited Philips's Cyder (2001), and a further collaborative edition of John Dyer's The Fleece is now in preparation. A chapter on pastoral and georgic 1660—1790 for the forthcoming Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature is also in progress.

Murray Pittock is Professor of Scottish and Romantic Literature and Head of the Department of English and American Studies at Manchester University. His main publications are in the area of nationality and identity, and include A New History of Scotland (2003), Scottish Nationality (2001), Celtic Identity and the British Image (1999), Jacobitism (1998), Inventing and Resisting Britain (1997), The Myth of the Jacobite Clans (1995, 1999), Poetry and Jacobite Politics in Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland (1994), and The Invention of Scotland (1991). He is currently working on a number of projects, including The Edinburgh History of Scottish Literature, James Boswell: The Political Correspondence, and The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in Europe for the British Academy's Reception of British Authors project.

Adam Rounce is Research Fellow, at Keele University, for the Cambridge edition of the works of Jonathan Swift. He has edited Alexander Pope and His Critics (2003) and The Selected Poetry of Charles Churchill (2003), and published articles on Dryden, Johnson, Akenside, Cowper, Warburton, and Churchill. He is currently writing a book on the idea of literary failure in the eighteenth century.

Valerie Rumbold is Reader in English Literature at the University of Birmingham. She is the author of Women's Place in Pope's World (1989) and editor of Alexander Pope: The Dunciad in Four Books (1999). She is one of the editors of the forthcoming Pope in the Longman Annotated English Poets series, and is currently editing the volume Parodies, Hoaxes, Treatises, Mock-Treatises for the Cambridge edition of the works of Jonathan Swift.

John Sitter is the Notre Dame Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. His books include Literary Loneliness in Mid-Eighteenth Century England (1982), Arguments of Augustan Wit (1991), and, as editor, The Cambridge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry (2001).

Richard Terry is Professor of English Literature at the University of Sunderland. He is the author of Poetry and the Making of the English Literary Past 1660-1781 (2001) and Mock-Heroic from Butler to Cowper: An English Genre and Discourse (2005), as well as numerous essays on eighteenth-century topics. He is currently working on the practice and allegation of plagiarism during the long eighteenth century.

David F. Venturo, Professor of English at The College of New Jersey, is author of Johnson the Poet: The Poetic Career of Samuel Johnson (1999) and editor of The School of the Eucharist. With a Preface Concerning the Testimony of Miracles (forthcoming), and has written extensively on British literature and culture, 1640—1830. He helps to edit ECCB. The Eighteenth Century: A Current Bibliography and The Scriblerian, and is writing a book, Fall'n on Evil Days: Alienation and Protest in Milton, Dryden, and Swift.

Abigail Williams is a Fellow and Tutor in English at St Peter's College, Oxford University. She is the author of Poetry and the Creation of a Whig Literary Culture, 1681-1715 (2005) and is currently working on John Dryden's Fables and editing Jonathan Swift's Journal to Stella for the new Cambridge edition of the works of Jonathan Swift.

Carolyn D. Williams is a Senior Lecturer in the School of English and American Literature at the University of Reading. She is the author of Pope, Homer and Manliness (1993) and numerous publications on eighteenth-century life and literature. Her broader interests include gender, medical history, and historical novels.

Thomas Woodman is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Reading. He is the author of Poetry and Politeness in the Age of Pope (1989) and A Preface to Samuel Johnson (1993) and editor of Early Romantics: Perspectives in British Poetry from Pope to Wordsworth (1998).

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