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My dress is silent when I tread the ground Or stay at home or stir upon the waters. Sometimes my trappings and the lofty air Raise me above the dwelling-place of men, And then the power of clouds carries me far Above the people and my ornaments Loudly resound, send forth a melody 1. The Old English riddles, like their counterparts in Latin poetic tradition (from which many of them are derived), are poems in which beings or objects from ordinary life are presented disguised in meta-phoric terms....

John Skelton 14601529

Ay, beshrew you by my fay, curse faith Avaunt, avaunt, my popinjay ' get out What, will ye do nothing but play Tilly vally, straw, let be I say Cup, Christian Clout, gup, Jack of the Vale With Mannerly Margery Milk and Ale. By Cod, ye be a pretty pode, And I love you an whole cart-load. 10 Straw, James Foder, ye play the fode, I am no hackney for your rod Co watch a bull, your back is broad Cup, Christian Clout, gup, Jack of the Vale With Mannerly Margery Milk and Ale. is Ywis ye deal...

From The Faerie Queene

Contayning The Legende of the Knight of the Red Crosse, or Lo I the man, whose Muse whilome did maske, formerly As time her taught, in lowly Shepheards weeds, Am now enforst a far unfitter taske, For trumpets sterne to chaunge mine Oaten reeds, And sing of Knights and Ladies gentle deeds noble Whose prayses having slept in silence long, Me, all too meane, the sacred Muse arceds To blazon broad emongst her learned throng Fierce warres and faithfullloves shall moralize my song. 9. These emblems...

Waltwhitman 181918921060

I (I celebrate myself, and sing myself) 1060 5 (I believe in you my soul, the other I am must not 6 (A child said What is the grass fetching it to me II (Twenty-eight young men bathe by the shore) 1062 13 (The negro holds firmly the reins of his four horses ) 1063 24 (Wait Whitman, a kosmos, of Manhattan the son) 1064 52 (The spotted hawk swoops by and accuses me ) 1065 Crossing Brooklyn Ferry 1066 When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer 1071 Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night 1071 Beat...

John Keats 17951821905

On First Looking into Chapman's Homer 905 On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again 905 RALPH WALDO EMERSON (1803-1882) 941 Ode (Inscribed to W. H. Channing) 943 ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING (1806-1861) 947 1 (I thought once how Theocritus had sung) 947 43 (How do I love thee Let me count the ways) 947 Aurora Leigh 948 From Book 5 Poets and the Present Age 948 A Musical Instrument 950 HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW (1807-1882) 951 From Part Ill Hiawatha's Childhood 954 Snow-Flakes 956 The Cross of...

Alison

When spray biginneth to springe, The lute foul hath hire wyl On hyre ludo to synge. Ich libbe in love-Ionginge For semlokest of alle thinge-HeO may me blisse bringe Ich am in hire baundoun An hendy hap ichabbe yhent2 lchot from hevene it is me sent From alle wymmen mi love is lent And lyhtO on Alysoun. twigs open, leaf out little bird its birdsong 1 live seemliest she power On heu hire hero is fayr ynoh, Hire browe broune, hire eye blake-With lossum chere he on me loh3-With middel smal and wel...

The Good Morrow

I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we loved were we not weaned till then But sucked on country1 pleasures, childishly Or snorted0 we in the Seven Sleepers' den 2 snored 5 'Twas so but0 this, all pleasures fancies be. except for Which I desired, and got, 'twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls, Which watch not one another out of fear 10 For love, all love of other sights controls, And makes one little room an everywhere.3 Let sea-discoverers to new worlds...

Queen Elizabeth I 15331603

When I was fair and young, then favor graced me. Of many was I sought their mistress for to be, sweetheart But I did scorn them all and answered them therefore Go, go, go, seek some other where, importune me no more. How many weeping eyes I made to pine in woe, How many sighing hearts I have not skill to show, But I the prouder grew and still this spake therefore Go, go, go, seek some otherwhere, importune me no more. Then spake fair Venus' son. that proud victorious boy, 10 Saying You dainty...

The Soho Hospital For Women By Fleur Adcock

TED HUGHES (1930-1998) The Thought-Fox 1810 Wind 1811 Pike 1812 Theology 1813 Examination at the Womb-Door Above Pate Valley 1816 Four Poems for Robin 1817 Instructions 1819 A Far Cry from Africa 1820 Nights in the Gardens of Port of Spain 1821 The Glory Trumpeter 1821 The Gulf 1822 From The Schooner Flight 1825 Midsummer 1827 Omeros 1827 Chapter XXXVIII 1827 VI (The princes of Mercia were badger and raven. VII (Gasholders, russet among fields. Milldams, marlpools) 1833 VIII (The mad are...

The Chambered Nautilus 974

EDGAR ALLAN POE (1809-1849) 975 ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON (1809-1892) 982 Mariana 982 The Kraken 984 The Lady of Shalott 984 The Lotos-Eaters 988 Ulysses 992 Break, Break, Break 994 Songs from The Princess 994 The Splendor Falls 994 Tears, Idle Tears 995 Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal 995 In Memoriam A. H. H. 996 1 (I held it truth, with him who sings) 996 2 (Old Yew, which graspest at the stones) 997 7 (Dark house, by which once more I stand) 997 11 (Calm is the morn without a sound) 997 19 (The...

The Cuckoo Song

Pound's translation omits the part of the original sentence that describes the gold buried with the brother's corpse as something that can bring no help to the soul that's full of sins, I Against God's wrath, although he the dead person hide it here I Ready before his death while yet he lives. The ensuing lines, in Hamer's translation, go as follows Great is the might of God, by which earth moves For He established its foundations firm, The land's expanses,...

Mary Sidney 15611621

And call ye this to utter what is just, You that of justice hold the sov'reign throne And call ye this to yield, O sons of dust, To wronged brethren ev'ry man his own 5 O no it is your long malicious will Now to the world to make by practice known, With whose oppression you the balance fill, Just to your selves, indiff'rent0 else to none.2 impartial But what could they, who ev'n in birth declined,3 10 From truth and right to lies and injuries To show the venom of their cankred0 mind corrupt,...

[The Last SurvivorJs Speech in Old English

Heald pu nu, hruse, nu haeled ne mostan, eorla a-hte Hweet, hyt ser on de gode begeaton. Guj)-dead fornam, 2250 feorh-bealo frecne fyra gehwylcne leoda minra, j ara de )is lif ofgeaf, gesawon sele-dreamas. Nah hwa sweord wege 4. This passage comes near the end of the poem. Beowulf, now an old king who has ruled the Geats for fifty years, must fight a fierce flying dragon that guards a treasure hoard and terrorizes the region. These lines tell the history of the treasure it is the accumulated...

Sidney Lanier 184218811162

GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS (1844-1889) God's Grandeur 1166 The Windhover 1166 As Kingfishers Catch Fire, Dragonflies Draw Flame 1167 Felix Randal 1168 Spring and Fall 1168 Carrion Comfort 1169 No Worst, There Is None. Pitched Past Pitch of Grief 1169 I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day 1170 My Own Heart Let Me More Have Pity On 1170 That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire and of the comfort of the Resurrection 1171 Thou Art Indeed Just, Lord 1172 Loveliest of Trees, the Cherry Now 1173 Reveille 1173...

Ye Goatherd Gods1

Strephon.2 Ye goatherd gods, that love the grassy mountains, Ye nymphs which haunt the springs in pleasant valleys, Ye satyrs3 joyed with free and quiet forests, Vouchsafe your silent ears to plaining music, 5 Which to my woes gives still an early morning, And draws the dolor on till weary evening. klaius. O Mercury, foregoer to the evening, O heavenly huntress4 of the savage mountains, O lovely star, entitled of the morning, 10 While that my voice doth fill these woeful valleys, Vouchsafe your...

Hobbinol

Contented I then will I singe his laye song Of fayre Elisa, Queene of shepheardes all 35 Which once he made, as by a spring he laye, And tuned it unto the Waters fall. Ye dayntye Nymphs, that in this blessed Brooke doe bathe your brest, For sake your watry bowres, and hether looke, 40 at my request And eke you Virgins, that on Parnasse dwell, Whence floweth Helicon the learned well, Helpe me to blaze Her worthy praise, 45 Which in her sexe doth all excell. 9. What maner of Ladde is he E.K . 1....

U

That some han slain hir housbondes in hir bed And lete hir lechour dighte hire al the night, Whan that the cors lay in the floor upright And some han driven nailes in hir brain Whil that they sleepe, and thus they han hem slain Some han hem yiven poison in hir drinke. He spak more hram than herte may bithinke, And therwithal he knew of mo proverbes Than in this world ther growen gras or herbes Bet is, quod he, thyn habitacioun Be with a leon or a foul dragoun Than with a womman using for to...

Howard Nemerov 192019911623

GEORGE MACKAYBROWN (1921-1996) 1627 The Old Women 1627 Haddock Fishermen 1628 Shroud 1628 Letters from a Father 1629 Falling in Love at Sixty-Five 1631 Love Calls Us to the Things of This World 1633 Piazza di Spagna, Early Morning 1634 A Baroque Wall-Fountain in the Villa Sciarra 1635

Lars Phoenician Lord

Nor is Osiris seen In Memphian grove or green, 215 Trampling the unshowered grass7 with lowings loud Nor can he be at rest Within his sacred chest Nought but profoundest Hell can be his shroud 7. Mythological female spirits inhabiting a particular place, object, or natural phenomenon. 8. Hostile spirits of the unburied dead. Lars tutelary gods or spirits of the ancient Romans, associated with particular places. 9. Baal, or Baal-Peor, the highest Canaanite god, whose shrine was at Mt. Peor....

Lyrics And Occasional Verse

Madame, ye been of alle beautee shrine As fer as cercled is the mapernounde For as the crystal glorious ye shine, And like ruby been youre cheekes rounde. are Therwith ye been so merye and so jocounde That at a revel whan that I see you daunce It is an oinement unto my wounde, Though ye to me ne do no daliaunce, For though I weepe of teres ful a tine, 10 Yit may that wo myn herte nat confounde Youre serny vois, that ye so smale outtwine, Maketh my thought in joye and blis habounde So curteisly...

The Tale

In th'olde dayes of the King Arthour, Of which that Britouns speken greet honour, Al was this land fulfild of falrye i The elf-queene with hirjoly compaignye queen of the fairies Daunced ful ofte in many a greene mede'i-c- meadow This was the olde opinion as I rcde think I speke of many hundred yeres ago. But now can no man see none elves mo, For now the grete charitee and prayeres Of limitours, and othere holy freres, That serchen every land and every streem, As thikke as moteso in the...

Marywroth 15871651347

I (When night's black mantle could most darkness prove) 347 3 (Yet is there Hope then Love but play thy part) 347 II (You endless torment that my rest oppress) 348 22 (Like to the Indians, scorched with the sun) 348 25 (Poor eyes be blind, the light behold no more) 349 37 (Night, welcome art thou to my mind distressed) 349 39 (If I were giv'n to mirth, 'twould be more cross) 350 74 Song (Love a child is ever crying) 350 A Crown of Sonnets Dedicated to Love 351 77 (In this strange labyrinth how...

Richard Hugo 192319821674

The Lady in Kicking Horse Reservoir 1675 DENISE LEVERTOV (1923-1997) 1677 Scenes from the Life of the Peppertrees 1677 JOHN ORMOND (1923-1990) Cathedral Builders 1681 Lament for a Leg 1681 JAMES SCHUYLER (1923-1991) 1683 DONALD JUSTICE (1925-2004) Counting the Mad 1684 Men at Forty 1685 Nostalgia of the Lakefronts 1686 Pantoum of the Great Depression

Henry King 15921669

An Exequy to His Matchless, Never-to-Be-Forgotten Friend1 Accept, thou shrine of my dead saint, Instead of dirges, this complaint 2 And for sweet flowers to crown thy hearse, Receive a strew0 of weeping verse scattering 5 From thy grieved friend, whom thou might'st see Quite melted into tears for thee, Dear loss since thy untimely fate My task hath been to meditate On thee, on thee thou art the book, 10 The library whereon I look, Though almost blind. For thee, loved clay,0 mortal I languish...

From A Sweet Nosegay

A Communication Which the Author Had to London, Before She Made Her Willi The time is come, I must depart from thee, ah famous city I never yet to rue my smart, pain Wherefore small cause there is, that I should grieve from thee to go Do such a fixed fancy set, 10 on those which least deserve, That long it is ere wit we get away from them to swerve. But time with pity oft will tell to those that will her try, 15 Whether it best be more to mell, mixwith And now hath time me put in mind of thy...

CiEdmons Hymn1

Nu sculon herigean Now we must praise Meotodes meahte the Measurer's might heofonrices Weard heaven-kingdom's Guardian, and his modgej anc and his mind-plans, raoncynnes Weard mankind's Guardian, 1. Csedmon's Hymn is probably the earliest extant Old English poem (composed sometime between 658 and 680). Old English texts have been preserved in copies of the Latin Ecclesiastical History ofthe English People, written by the great scholar Bede (ea. 673-735). Bede tells how Credrnon, an illiterate...

The Seafareri

May I for my own self song's truth reckon, Journey's jargon, how I in harsh days 1. This poem appears in the Exeter Book, a tenth-century manuscript collection of Old English poetry. This translation, by the American poet Ezra Pound (1885-1972 see pp. 1295-1310), was published in 1912 it ends at line 99. The end of the Old English poem, from Richard Hamer's translation, is provided in note 8 below. The poem realistically describes the hardships of a seafaring life, but some critics suggest that...

William Cowper 17311800695

Light Shining out of Darkness 695 Epitaph on a Hare 696 The Task 697 From Book IV The Winter Evening 697 From Book VI The Winter Walk at Noon 699 The Castaway 702 Lines Written during a Period of Insanity 704 ANNA LAETITIA BARBAULD (1743-1825) 705 The Rights of Woman 705 To the Poor 706 Life 706 Inscription in a Beautiful Retreat Called Fairy Bower 707 From The Slave Trade 709 CHARLOTTE SMITH (1749-1806) 711 Written in the Church Yard at Middleton in Sussex 711 Written near a Port on a Dark...

O95

Why fare ye thus with me this firste night Ye faren like a man hadde lost his wit. What is my gilt For Goddes love, telle it, And it shal been amended if I may. Amended quod this knight. Allas, nay, nay, It wol nat been amended neveremo. Thou art so lothly and so old also, And therto comen of so lowe a kinde, That litel wonder is though I walwe and winde. So wolde God myn herte wolde brestel' Is this, quod she, the cause of youre unreste Ye, certainly, quod he. No wonder is. Now sire, quod she,...

Edward Herbert 15821648

Black beauty, which above that common light, Whose power can no colors here renew But those which darkness can again subdue, Do st still remain unvary'd to the sight, 5 And like an object equal to the view, Art neither chang'd with day, nor hid with night When all these colors which the world call bright, And which old poetry doth so persue, Are with the night to perished and gone, 10 That of their being there remains no mark, Thou still abidest so entirely one, That we may know thy blackness...

The Wifes Lamenti

I sing this song about myself, full sad, My own distress, and tell what hardships I Have had to suffer since I first grew up, Present and past, but never more than now I ever suffered grief through banishment. For since my lord departed from this people Over the sea, each dawn have I had care Wondering where my lord may be on land. When I set off to join and serve my lord, 10 A friendless exile in my sorry plight, My husband's kinsmen plotted secretly How they might separate us from each other...

Wel Coude She Carye A Morsel And Wel Keepe

The place-names in the following lines refer to battlegrounds in these continuing wars. 7. Sat in the seat of honor at military feasts. 8. Tournaments fought to the death 1. The lord of Palatye was a Muslim alliances of convenience were often made during the Crusades between Christians and Muslims. 2. I.e., he was wise as well as bold. 3. Any sort of person. In Middle English, negatives are multiplied for emphasis, as in these two lines nevere, no, ne, no. 5. I.e., he...

From Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum1

Sith Cynthia2 is ascended to that rest since That glorious place that cannot be expressed By any wight0 clad in mortality, person 5 In her almighty love so highly blessed, And crowned with everlasting sov'reignty Where saints and angels do attend her throne, And she gives glory unto God alone. 1. Hail God, King of the Jews (Latin) a variant of the inscription on Christ's cross. Lanyer claimed that the title came to her in a dream. This long text is prefaced by a prose address (To the Virtuous...

Acknowledgments

Among our many critics, advisors, and friends, the following were of special help in preparing the Fifth Edition. For assisting us in researching and preparing texts and other materials, thanks to John Barrell, Mike Bell, Steve Cassal, Alfred E. David, Ed Doughtie, Harriet Guest, S. Kristin Hall, Katie Kalpin, Laura Maestrelli, Andy Majeske, Frank Murphy, Marijane Osborn, and Beth Robertson. For preparing the biographical sketches, thanks to Sherri Vanden Akker and Jane Potter. Special thanks...

[The Last SurvivorJs Speech

Death had come and taken them all in times gone by and the only one left to tell their tale, the last of their line, could look forward to nothing 2240 but the same fate for himself he foresaw that his joy in the treasure would be brief. A newly constructed barrow stood waiting, on a wide headland close to the waves, its entryway secured. Into it the keeper of the hoard had carried 2245 all the goods and golden ware worth preserving. His words were few Now, earth, hold what earls once held and...

From Troilus And Criseide1

400 If no love is, 0 God, what feele I so And if love is, what thing and which is he If love be good, from whennes cometh my wo If it be wikke, a wonder thinketh me, Whan every torment and adversitee 405 That cometh of him may to me savory thinke, pleasant seem For ay thurste I, the more that ich it drinke. I And if that at myn owene lust I brenne, burn From whennes cometh my wailing and my plainte lament If harm agree me, wherto plaine I thenne 3-410 I noot, ne why unwery that I fainte. 2....

Elegy VII2

Nature's lay idiot,3 I taught thee to love, And in that sophistry,4 oh, thou dost prove Too subtle Fool, thou didst not understand The mystic language of the eye nor hand 5 Nor couldst thou judge the difference of the air Of sighs, and say, this lies, this sounds0 despair expresses Nor by the'eye's water call a malady Desperately hot, or changing feverously. I had not taught thee then, the alphabet 10 Of flowers, how they devicefully0 being set ingeniously And bound up, might with speechless...

Anonymous Elizabethan And Jacobean Poems

Is the burden of my song. refrain Burneth soon to waste. Still, I would not have thee cold, Not too backward, nor too bold Love that lasteth till 'tis old Fadeth not in haste. Love me little) love me long) 10 Is the burden of my song. 6. Child's asterisks signal a gap in the story. 7. I.e., if you make me the lady of one poor plow (the area of land one plow will till in a year). 8. With the suggestion that she can make the knight lord of three plows, the story begins to reveal that the...

From Beowulfl

Introduction History and Praise of the Danes Account of Grendel's Attacks on Heorot and the kings who ruled them had courage and greatness. We have heard of those princes' heroic campaigns. There was Shield Sheafson, scourge of many tribes, a wrecker of mead-benches, rampaging among foes. This terror of the hall-troops had come far. A foundling to start with, he would flourish later on as his powers waxed and his worth was proved. In the end each clan on the outlying coasts 10 beyond the...

The Wife of Baths Prologue and Tale1

Experience, though noon auctoritee Were in this world, is right ynough for me To speke of wo that is in mariage For lordinges, sith I twelfyeer was of age- gentlemen Thanked be God that is eterne on live-Housbondes at chirche dore- I have had five (If I so ofte mighte han wedded be), 1. The Wife of Bath's prologue and tale have no link to a preceding tale and together occupy different positions in the many manuscript versions of The Canterbury Tales. Most scholars agree, however, that the...

The General Prologue

Whan that April with his showres soote its fresh The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich licour, i Of which vertu- engendred is the flowr Whan Zephyrus eek with his sweete breeth the West Wind also Inspired hath in every holt and heeth breathed into grove field The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne shoots Hath in the Ram his halve cours yronne, 4. This poem, with a musical accompaniment designed for two voices, appears on one side of a page in a...

Conch From Sicily Poem

DOUGLAS DUNN (b. 1942) A Removal from Terry Street 1927 In the Grounds 1927 Elegies 1928 Thirteen Steps and the Thirteenth of March 1928 Navulad, St. Nicholas Ave. 1929 A Conch from Sicily 1930 Gretel in Darkness 1931 The Garden 1931 Vita Nova 1932 MICHAEL ONDAAT E (b. 1943) 1933 Driving with Dominic in the Southern Province We See Hints of the Circus 1935 House on a Red Cliff 1935 Of this cloth doll which 1936 I Do Not 1937 That the Science of Cartography Is Limited 1938 The Dolls Museum in...

Editorial Procedures

The order is chronological, poets appearing according to their dates of birth and their poems according to dates of publication in volume form (or estimated dates of composition in the case of Old and Middle English poets). The publication date is printed at the end of each poem, and to the right when two dates are printed, they indicate published versions that differ in an important way. Dates on the left, when given, are those of composition. Many of our texts are modernized to help readers,...

Anonymous Lyrics Of The Fifteenth Centuryl

Adam lay i-bounden, bounden in a bond Foure thousand winter thought he not too long. And all was for an apple, an apple that he took, As clerkes finden written in theire book. Ne hadde the apple taken been, the apple taken been, Ne hadde never our Lady aye been heavene queen. Blessed be the time that apple taken was, Therefore we moun singen, llDeo graciasl' That is makeles King of alle kinges ToO her sone she chees. for chose He cam also stille as silently Ther his moder was where mother 10 To...

Psalm 114 In Exitu Israel Mary Sidney

SIR PHILIP SIDNEY 1554-1586 Ye Goatherd Gods 208 What Length of Verse 210 The Nightingale 211 Ring Out Your Bells 212 1 Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show 213 14 Alas, have I not pain enough, my friend 213 21 Your words my friend right healthful caustics blame 214 25 The wisest scholar of the wight most wise 214 31 With how sad steps, Oh Moon, thou climb'st the skies 214 39 Come sleep, Oh sleep, the certain knot of peace 215 47 What, have I thus betrayed my liberty 215 48 Soul's...