Time Line Of Latin Literature

The names of authors included in the selections are in boldface. The exact date of birth and death of many authors is uncertain; in some cases, an approximate year is given, but for others, only the time of writing can be given (indicated by_fL, i.e., floruit (flourished)).

author political background u «

THE BEGINNINGS OF ROMAN LITERATURE

Livius Andronicus (ft. 240-207 B.C.) epic, drama Naevius (JL 235-204 B.C.) epic, drama

Bnnius (239-169 b.ct)

epic, drama, didactic, satire Plautus (fl. 220-184 B.C.)

comeciy Cato (234-149 B.C.) speeches, history .

Lutatius Catulus

First Carthaginian War (264-241 B.C.) Second Carthaginian War (2x8-201 B.C.) : Rome is established as a Mediterranean power by the end of the century

Third Carthaginian War (149-146 B.C.) Roman power is extended to Greece and elsewhere

Sulla's dictatorship (82-79 B.C.)

THE GOLDEN AGE OF LATIN LITERATURE

". De bello Gallico, De hello civili Cicero (106-43 b.c.) speeches, letters, philosophical and rhetorical treatises, poetry Lucretius (c. 94-c. 55 b.c.)

■■ De rerum-,natura . Catullus (c. 84-c. 54 b.c.) .. elegiac, lyric and occasional poetry, mini-epic Sallust(c<M4c;;i$^BiC.)..history Publilius Syrus (first century b.c.) mimes

Caesar conquers Gaul (58-51 b.c.) Caesar crosses the Rubicon (49 b.c.) and begins a civil war against Pompey and supporters of the Senate Caesar emerges victorious but is assassinated in 44 b.c.

author i political background

Caesars heir, Octavian, forms a triumvirate with Marcus Antonius and Lepidus (43 b.c.) to prosecute the civil war against Caesars assassins Brutus and Cassius are defeated at

Philippi (42, b.c.) Further fighting comes to an end with Octavians victory at Actium (31 b.c.) over his former partner, Marcus Antonius, who had allied himself with the Egyptian queen Cleopatra All Mediterranean countries are now under Roman control Octavians position as sole ruler is symbolized by his adoption of the name Augustus (27 b.c.) Death of Augustus (a.d. 14)

pastoral, didactic, epic Horace (65-8 b.c.)

lyric, didactic, satire Propertius (fl. 25 b.c.)

elegiac Tibullus (c. 50-19 b.c.) elegiac

Lygdamus (late first century b.c.) elegiac Ovid (43 b.c.™a+d. 17)

elegiac, narrative poetry Livy (59 b.c.—a.d* 17) history

THE SILVER AGE OF LATIN LITERATURE

Manilius (early first century a.d.) Astronómica Phaedrus (c. 15 b.c.-c. a.d. 50)

fables Persius (a.d. 34-62) satire

Seneca (c, 2 b.c.-a.d. 65) tragedy, letters, philosophical treatises Petronius>(d, a.d. 66)

Satiricon Lucan (a.d. 39-65) epic

Valerius Flaccus (late first century a.d.) Argonautica Quintilian (c. a.d. 35—c. 95)

Institutio oratoria Statius (c. a.d, 50-c. 96)

epic, occasional poetry Silius Italicus

(c. a.d. 26-c. 102) epic Martial (c. a.d. 40-c. 102) epigrams

The Julio-Claudian line, which Augustus had begun, continues with the emperors Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero, but ends with Nero's suicide in a.d. 68 ■

Claudius conquers Britain (a.d. 44) Political unrest leads to the establishment of the Flavian line by Vespasian in a.d. 69 This continues with Titus and Domitian, but ends with the latter's assassination in a.d. 96

author:

satfri - m», \ *r>,> ■* , Pliny the Younger (c. a.d. 6a-c. ii?) letters, speeches Tacitus (c. a'.d. 56-c. 120) history

Tiberianus (fl, a.d, 300) probable, author of the P^rvtgthum Venerts Cl.iudian ^c a d. 370-1. 40 epic, elegiac political background

A more liberal regime begins with Nerva 1 in a.d'. 96 and continues for most of the second century The Roman Empire is at its greatest extent under Trajan (emperor from a.d+ 98 to 117)

The imperial system continues, but Constantine (d. a.d. 337) founds Constantinople as the New Rome (a.d, 330)

The western half of the empire comes under increasing pressure from the north, which culminates m the sack of Rome in a.D. 410 by the Visigoths

ITALY, GREECE; AND THE TROAD

Adapted from Mountain High Maps' Copyright © 1995 Digital Wisdom, Inc.

250 miles

(Boreas north

THjt a

The shaded area encompassing the Via Sacra at the center of the map is the Roman Forum.

1 Pantheon

2 Theater of Pompey

3 Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus

4 Senate-house (Curia)

5 Temple of Peace S Temple of Vesta

7 Colosseum

8 Circus Maximus

9 Temple of Diana

Stairwell

Every third perimeter room had a staircase to upper-tier seating

Septizodium

This ornamental monument greeted visitors entering Rome from the Via Appia

Arcade

This covered walkway surrounded the Circus

Arch of Titus

This triple arch is not to be confused with the triumphal arch built southeast of the Forum

Stairwell

Every third perimeter room had a staircase to upper-tier seating

Septizodium

This ornamental monument greeted visitors entering Rome from the Via Appia

Arcade

This covered walkway surrounded the Circus

Arch of Titus

This triple arch is not to be confused with the triumphal arch built southeast of the Forum

Back-to-back tabernae

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