Anacreon

The fragments from Anaereon we have poetry very distinct in character from that of any of his predecessors. As a monodic poet, who writes chiefly of love and wine, he is the successor of Alcaeus and Sappho, and the three together arc almost the only Greek representatives of Lyric poetry, as we understand it, namely of the subjective and personal order. But beyond this Anaereon has little in common with the Lesbians. He alone of all the Melic poets proper employed the Ionic dialect, though we...

D aaut xyyiv jyyi jyyjvyGji

For the Relative, besides the proper form 0 , etc., we more usual )' find the form with initial t, strictly speaking demonstrative e.g. x.7.tt7.v (Alcacus) .a )' cov. From 'j'tt',-. or rather octic, we have (besides oI'tivs ) ottl, ottiva.c etc. The neuter ottl originally is due to assimilation from oft-tl and in ottlv , etc., Lesbian was probably misled by the analog ' of otti, and of o-77ot (Lesb. 0 77770 t 7.), o-ttco , ottou, where 0 (or oft) is employed merely as an adverbial prefix., to...

Sappho And Alcaeus

See Alcaeus XI., Sappho x., and Plate 1. (Frontispiece). The story of romantic relations between Alcaeus and Sappho rests on no less authority than that of Aristotle. In Rhet. i. 9. 20 he states that Alcaeus addressed the line ihXw xt ji-rjv x.x.X. to Sappho, and that the poetess made answer in the stanza El o' 7jys EaXwv x.x.X. The line 'Io Xox' ayva x.x.X. is quoted separately by Hephaestion from Alcaeus, but is plausibly enough connected with 1. 2 by Bergk, and his example is generally...

Metre In Lyric Poetry

IN this Article I propose to give a short sketch of the development of the lyrical metres, and to add some remarks on the general principles on which they are regulated in accordance with the views of certain metricians whom I have followed. I shall then conclude with a description of the chief types of metrical style with which we are concerned. In the rapid transition from Epic to Lyric poetry, Revival of we notice a revolution effected in metre as in all other f0 esnt metrical respects. The...

Apretpe cf X 5 vdou Traprjopo

Bergk a (Walz). (b) Orig. adz> . Cels. ii. 74 'O Ilctpio 'ap- orcoto tov Auxafj. r)v ( vaot-cf. Dio Chrys. ii. 746. Huschke thinks that this passage belongs to the same poem as the Fable of The Fox and the Eagle, No. vi. If so, this is the application of the story to the case of Archilochus and Lycambes, the words a'Xocc ts y.ai -pa-stav matching uvwvirjv epi av (vi. a.). V. Oux.c'O-' aoj y tX Hephaest. 35 and 30. The two lines are not unsuitably placed together by...

A L C A E U S

O'oaxo , xa -e'vxe o' oivou xuaO-ou to avoppisxi ava ot-(uxe pa ap cKo. Judging from these and other passages (e.g. Ar. Knights 1184), it appears to have been customary to mention the water first. 1. 5. .ax. x.s aXa , adopting Porson's punctuation (v. Bergk, note ad toe.), implies that the cups were to be brimming over for xEcpaXr 11 tin's sense cf. Theocr. viii. 87, u-sp y.zoaXa , of a milk-pail. It is hardly so likely that xaxx x.EcpaXx can be used in the sense of -1 x.saaXrJv, ' headlong,'...

Dance As An Accompaniment Of Greek Song

IN the previous Article I have endeavoured to point out the reason of the predominance in Greek poetry of choral song, in which the dance formed one of the chief accompaniments. I now wish to dwell more in detail upon this connection of dance and song at the different periods, and to consider, so far as circumstances allow, what was the function and the nature of the dance in Lyric poetry. Epic, the earliest form of Greek poetry with which we are acquainted, was of course unaccompanied by the...

Parthen10n

The discovery of this fragment, from which I have taken nearly all that is intelligible, is an incident of considerable interest, not only from the literary value of the rescued poem alone, but because of the possibilities thus opened out of the further recovery of lost Greek literature.1 The parchment containing this Parthenion (see p. 9), was found among the Egyptian tombs by Mariette in 1855, and handed over by him to Egger, who published it in Memoires d'histoire ancienne et de philologie...

S I M O N I D E S

The life of Simonides is of great interest, if for no other reason than that with his eighty-nine years of vigorous manhood he is linked on the one hand with the older and simpler Greece, to which all our Melic poets have so far belonged, and on the other with that new world of thought which, for good and for evil, developed so rapidly after the Persian wars. We are now no longer in the region of conjecture or of pure ignorance, but have the opportunity of attaining to something like historical...

General View Of The History Of Greek Melic Toetry

In the previous articles i have had occasion to mention nearly all the names of those who were most active in furthering the early development of Melic poetry and its accompaniments, while of the chief poets, any part of whose works have survived, an account will be found in connec-Object. tion with the text. I purpose in this article to give a brief connected sketch of the course followed by Melic poetry, noticing especially the influence exerted upon its progress by the historical...

Eyto 31 [vaiio xX Et ill 2

I have placed this and the next three passages together, since they display to some extent the poet's personal character (v. Biog. p. 85). I. 2. 0501, Bk. for 0. X0oviovs seems to be explained by Hesychius - 9-ovia' Xc .pu a. i.i'va, Pape'a, oo 3spa. Bergk translates it here, ' callide celans iram'. Jacobs axoXiou . 'Pu9-p.ouc, 'temper,' cf. Theogn. 964 7Zo v oiv EiSf avopa aatprjvto ooyr(v .at cuOp.ov xavt xpotzov oaxt av iq. II. 3-4. ' I have found thee, O Megistes, to be one of the gentle in...

Lyrics Sim Simon Poem

Sic. xi. II. 2t J.wvtor . . . a tov xi) apsxr auxwv lyy.cojj.iov. It is doubtful to what description of Melic poetry this song belongs, for Diodorus' expression yy.w' j.tov is obviously not to be understood in a technical sense. It may have been intended for some public funeral ceremony, as it were, in honour of the heroes of Thermopylae. 1. 2. ' Glorious their fortune, and splendid their fate.' Tu'ya fors, roxpo sors (Schneidewin), the former being the chance...

Sappho

Quoted by Dionys. de Comp. Verb. c. 23, as an example of the ' finished style ' (yXxcppo yxpxy.xijp), in which, he says, Sappho excels all other Melic composers. He adds xauxr, xr )j z(o r eus'-eix xx q apt sv xr, tjvs E' x xai Xctoxr,XL yiyovs x< ov app.ovtcov. See Lesb. Dial, for oviatai ( aviain), p. 85 the adverbs xuios, xr Xui ( xrjXocjj), p. 88 atnoxa, ( e'ihoxs, note on Spartan Dance-song I. and p. 85) ypu'nov ( ypuTccv), p. 85 -ows, -xicra in the participles,...

Pindars Fragments Threnoi

Rhet. p. 69, that Pindar's Dirges were written j.zja.lor.pzr.iog and those of Simonides 7 ai> 7 xtxtoi will be fully appreciated by any who compare the following passages with e.g. the 'Danae' of Simonides (No. I.). The latter, by exalting the incident into the region of mythic ideality (cf. p. 19) affords an indirect consolation by lending a poetic beauty to the sorrow of the mourners. Pindar endeavours to transcend the sadness of the occasion and to carry...

Miscellaneous And Anonymous

This passage is ascribed to Arion by Aelian, Hist. An. xii. 45, in illustration of the musical taste of dolphins. Modern critics are almost unanimous in discrediting Aelian's testimony that the hymn was composed by Arion. The language and metre are entirely unsuited to a pupil of Alcman, as Suidas describes Arion (see p. 102), and the shallow verbosity .is eminently suggestive of the later dithy- rambic period, to which Bergk assigns the passage. The poem need not have been intended as a...

Info

'OpiKa, of Diana, Alcm. i. 28. opO-ta j.sXr p. 233. opxtaxo j.eiv, Timoc. ii. p' 2. opvr wv, Alcm xxi. p'. optro'Xo-o Apr, , Anac. xxix. a'. opy7)< jT7)s, of Pan, Scol. vi. 2. oaao o'joc, Sap. i. 26 xxvii. 1. o xe, Alcm. ii. 3. oxxt, oxxiva , p. 88 Alcae. i. 2 Sap. xv. (a), etc. ocpeiXsi, impersonal, Timoc. iii. 1 note. IIaya 7 7 y< i , Stes. i. P' 2. raiSixoi u j.voi, Bacchyl. i. 12. 7 aiooihv, sense in Ibyc. i. 10. r.siiix 7 aaa, Alcae. xvi. I Sap. ii. 14. r xfaozi x X'Xei, Alcm. xvii. 1....

Aaa v Stob Flor Ixxx 4 Another refusal from Sappho to a suitor

Dial, for ap.p.tv, p. 87 tuvFoix v auvotxeiiv , pp. 82, 89. 1. 2. auvFoixrjv, Schneidewin or we may read iuvo gt xr v, and regard u as lengthened in arsi. Cf. on Alcaeus xvii. Bergk, in a different metre, reads uvo .r,v vito -f 'hox from two MSS. v ' ounx. XII. 2xa h x.x.a. Athen. xiii. 564 D. The metre is uncertain. According to Bergk's arrangement, as in the text, the second line is an ordinary Alcaic hendecasyllable. Tav ciaaoi - -. ., 'unveil, or reveal, the beauty in thine eyes.'...