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Lecture Sixty Four Reconceiving Center and Margin

Scope Though the African material is essential to Celie's rebirth, it is her colloquial speech that is the heart of the novel. Though a novel of pathos, we learn in lecture 64, The Color Purple offers a prognosis of hope. It is, however, a hope informed by class warfare, colonialism, and slavery. Like Adrienne Rich, Walker would offer an alternative to history, this one a version that admits everyone as a child of God.

Pressed By The Moon Charlotte

The remaining narrative presents in vivid horror the scene, beginning with the declarative Lo Their bones whiten in the frequent wave But vain to them the winds and waters rave. Smith uses irony in her description of the washing clean of the bones by water, often seen as a symbol of cleansing or rebirth. However, in this case those to whom the bones originally belonged do not benefit from the cleansing. They remain deaf to the raving of wind or water. As Smith notes with italics for emphasis, They hear the warring elements no more. The emphasis shifts the attention back to the speaker, for while the dead cannot observe the frightening scene, which Smith emphasizes by using FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE (FIGURE OF SPEECH) to compare it to the destruction of war, the observer can.

Lecture Twenty Four Farewells and Falling Leaves

Scope In this final lecture of the entire course, we shall continue a motif from the previous one, i.e., how poets respond to, imitate, and echo one another. And we shall do so with regard to perhaps the most resonant trope in Western literature, the motif of the falling leaves, which we shall follow from its source in Homer's Iliad through various reappearances up to the present day. Perhaps the enduring nature of elegy as a form has persuaded our poets for more than two millennia to use and reuse this motif of seasonal death and rebirth.

Poetic Originality and the Whig Sublime

As I have argued, many Whig writers were convinced that the Revolution of 1688 marked a decisive moment in the establishment of modern political liberty. Not only did they believe that it would produce a rebirth of native literary culture, they also claimed that the Revolution demanded literary modes that would reflect its radical implications. The influential literary critic John Dennis argued for the need for new poetic forms to free English literature from the cultural hegemony of the pagan ancients. He believed that the future of contemporary poetry lay in the Christian sublime. In his critical essay The Grounds of Criticism in Poetry (1704) he argued that, by

Ye That Pasen By The Weye

Wyrd and the Limits of Human Understanding A Thematic Sequence in the Exeter Book. JEGP 85 (1986) 323-331. Payne, Anne E. Three Aspects of Wyrd in Beowulf. In Old English Studies in Honor of John C. Pope, edited by Robert B. Burlin and Edward B. Irving, Jr., 15-35. Toronto University of Toronto Press, 1974.

Sing Of A Maiden Anonymous 15th

The following three stanzas, which deal with the Immaculate Conception itself, contain a great deal of religious symbolism. Dew was a common medieval symbol for the Holy Ghost, and April signifies the rebirth and regeneration that occur in springtime, and, correspondingly, the new beginning for humankind that Christ's birth brought about. Throughout the three stanzas, the dew falls in three different places. Just as Christ is characterized as dew in these lines, Mary is symbolized in turn as the grass, the flower, and the spray. The grass might refer to Mary's humility the flower was a medieval symbol for virginity, and Mary was often associated in medieval literature with the rose the spray can be taken as a reference to the outcome of the union between the human and divine. The spray seems to refer to the rod of Jesse a flowering branch symbolically representing the birth of Christ to Mary. More than just three different representations of Mary, these symbols are also steps in a...

Hadas Rachel 1948 Rachel Hadas

Combines both traditional and postmodern poetic forms with a background in classical Greek, infusing commonplace topics with elegiac and transformational elements (see prosody and free verse). Her poems deal with universal issues of mortality, metamorphosis, and rebirth but also include personal moments of emotional vulnerability. Hadas has been influenced by James merrill, who turned away from the modernism of T. S. eliot to a poetics of transcendence. she emphasizes the incompleteness of death as having no closure and shows poetry as an unfinished business, which fosters rebirth.

Epitaph On Sp A child of queen Elizabeths Chapel Ben Jonson 1616

The next four lines describe S.P. as a child who so thrived In grace and feature heaven stood in competition with nature as to which of their influences he reflected. Although When Fates turned cruel, he was scarce thirteen the speaker emphasizes his few years were well spent, for three filled zodiacs had he been The stage's jewel. He acted so well, the speaker surmises, that Parcae, or the Fates, likely perceived him as a veteran, thus mistaking him as an old man whose time had come. When they discovered their error, nothing could be done thus, as the fourth line had stated, Death was sorry. They might have attempted a rebirth for the boy, or tried In baths to steep him, a reference critics believe may have been to mystical

Slow Slow Fresh Fount Ben

Jonson retains focus on water imagery as a symbol of grief and death, rather than as the traditional symbol of new life or rebirth. He later incorporates into Cynthia's Revels aspects of the medieval masque in order to focus on the price of sin, reflected by Narcissus's punishment for his pride.

They Are All Gone Into The World Of Light Henry Vaughan 1655

In the collection by Henry Vaughan titled Silex Scintil-lans Vaughan includes a number of poems that focus on death. Among these is They Are All Gone into the World of Light which provides a strong example of Vaughan's positive attitudes toward death. He has no fear of dying, as he inevitably expresses death as resulting in an opportunity for humans to experience rebirth through Christ's regenerative sacrifice. Critics note that this poem focuses on the death of Vaughan's brother, William, as had Silence, and stealth of days However, Vaughan wrote it later and universalized the death theme to apply to the many others he knew who had also died. This speaker does not so much grieve for those lost as wish he could join them, opening with the title line, the next three lines noting, And I alone sit lingering here. The participle lingering is a passively active verb, indicating a result of indecision.

William Carlos Williams

Further, the imagery and diction emphasize the desolation ofthe scene we find the waste ofbroad, muddy fields, the patches of standing water, and the scattering oftrees. But in the latter part ofthe poem, we begin to witness signs of rebirth rising from the mud. The inclusive indefiniteness of the pronoun in the phrase They enter the new world naked allows us to view the process as a kind of birth as well. The prose context of the poem within the text of Spring and All - a book devoted to the renewal of the imagination - also suggests that Williams also had in mind the birth of new forms of poetry.

T S Eliot and the wasteland of modernity

Eliot had suffered greatly from a disastrous marriage to Vivien Haigh-Wood in 1916. The other important context for the poem was World War I and its aftermath, which clearly took its toll on Eliot as it did on every writer or artist of his time. It is no mere coincidence that the opening section of The Waste Land is entitled The Burial of the Dead the poem is obsessed with death, and with the hoped-for possibility of a psychological and spiritual rebirth.

The scope of ghazal poetry

To the ghazal poet, Nature in particular is full of analogies to his experiences in love. He finds them in particular in the season of Spring, when the rebirth of nature provides the strongest impulses to his imagination. A garden in full vernal flower is an almost inexhaustible source of symbolic references to perfect beauty and, thereby, to the beauty of the poet's idol. The cypress, which in Persian was said to be a 'free' tree, represented the slim, elegant stature of the admired person whereas red flowers like tulips and roses provided the equivalent of blushing cheeks, the

Bibliography On The Use Of Figurative Language In Poetry

However, in the sixth stanza, the speaker adds that in age I bud again, After so many deaths I live and write, once more enjoying the scents of dew and rain. Herbert's reference to writing emphasizes a rebirth of creativity and acts as an autobiographical reference. The speaker can hardly believe he is the same individual On whom thy tempests fell all night.

Khaqani and other twelfth century poets of the qaslda

The themes broached by KhaqanI in his religious poetry are mostly limited to the sphere of the zuhdiyat, which was defined earlier in this chapter. He condemns the world and preaches the necessity to withdraw from it into a life of poverty and contentment he denounces the tyranny of the lower soul pointing the way towards inner purification which is also the path to a deliverance from the world and a preparation for the life to come. The note of a complaint is frequently struck in his poems, not only with regard to his spiritual distress, but also in matters of a more mundane nature, such as his dealings with his patrons. In some poems he describes his situation as an 'emprisonment', but it is doubtful whether this should be taken as a reference to a real captivity.15 The veneration of the Prophet is a recurrent theme, often combined with descriptions of the pilgrimage, the Ka'ba and the Prophet's grave in Medina. To his favourite images belong emblems of light and rebirth like the...

Restoration The The term Restoration

Theaters reopened and dramatic portrayals encouraged sexual and social freedom. Imbued with a new energy, poetry flourished, first in the extremes seen in libertine poetry, such as that by John Wilmot, second earl of Rochester. Disasters within a decade of Charles Il's taking power, the plague of 1665 and the Great Fire of 1666, also affected artistic expression, which often reflected the social and political atmosphere of its day. London enjoyed a rebirth after the destruction of disease and flame, resulting in increased financial prosperity for those involved in trade and colonialism. However, it also produced an increasing separation of the wealthy from the poor, firmly supporting class division in England and subsequent government corruption. England's tumultuous relationship with Ireland and Scotland also affected poets, both Royalist sympathizers and nonsym-pathizers, of all three countries. British poets reflecting Restoration events and social and religious mores included...

General Survey Of Periods Authors And Works

The volume also points to the reincarnation of poets' works and lives in new media. One well-known example is the popular 20th-century version of Gay's 18th-century opera, Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's The Threepenny Opera. It produced the enduring song Mack the Knife with which the modern singer Bobby Darin remains identified. As another example, the scandalous 18th-century poetry by John Wilmot, second earl of Rochester, gained renewed interest after a 2004 movie version of Wilmot's life, The Libertine, starring Johnny Depp. In addition Christopher Smarts mad poem My Cat Jeoffrey from his Jubilate Agno enjoyed rebirth when the 20th-century composer Benjamin Britten adopted a short excerpt from the poem for use in his festival cantata Rejoice in the Lamb. Such examples make clear the enduring quality of stirring literature.

San Francisco Renaissance In the

One of the reasons for the familial relationship between the so-called Beat generation and San Francisco Renaissance is that the renaissance, the rebirth of poetry in San Francisco, is commonly dated from the incredible moment in october 1955 when the Six Gallery was the scene of Allen ginsberg's first public performance of howl, undoubtedly one of the most important moments in American poetry the master of ceremonies that evening was, rexroth, who was a precursor influential in the development of most San Francisco Renaissance poets, some of whom also read at that remarkable event Philip whalen, Gary snyder, Michael mcclure, and Philip Lamantia. Jack kerouac was also there, liberally pouring out the wine and musically urging the readers on with exclamations of Go Go This is the night which prompted Lawrence ferlinghetti to send Ginsberg the famous telegram, echoing Emerson's to whitman, welcoming him into his career and asking to publish the poem. The selection of poetry presented...

Paterson and Williams later poetry

Williams uses the flexibility of the form to his advantage, stretching his thought back across the page from the end of one three-line unit to the beginning of the next it is as if a sweet-scented flower were poised. The circling movement suggested by the use of the triadic feet establishes the thematic and symbolic motion of the poem as a whole, which moves through the recognition of the fact of death to an affirmation of the transcendent power oflove.11 The asphodel itself is the flower of the dead, which in classical mythology covers the Elysian Fields. Since the flower was also familiar to Williams from his childhood in modern-day New Jersey, its use here represents the confluence of poetic tradition with his local world.12 The flower links past and present, and its symbolic resonance moves between death and a rebirth through love and memory. Williams, who resisted overt symbolism throughout most of his career, now allows himself to indulge freely in the process of turning image...

Early Modern V Renaissance

Term Renaissance (or Renascence) literally means rebirth. In the context of cultural studies (history, literature, fine arts, religion, sociology, etc.), the term applies to the time immediately after the Middle Ages. More specifically, it refers to the rebirth of the classi

The Maximus Poems

The same tendencies are evident in the poem's treatment of Gloucester history. The burden of attention is placed on three origin stories the city's first founding in 1623 its rebirth in 1642 and the founding of its satellite community, Dogtown, in the early eighteenth century. Around these three principal creation stories a group of subsidiary 'firsts' is arranged the arrival of Gloucester's first shipwright the building of Gloucester's first schooner the establishment of the city's first salt-works, and so on. The historical matter is not fixed and dogmatic, for as each of the three volumes of